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. you look at this kind of environment where i would say that investment decisions are not so easy to make. we have a really low interest rate environment, and if you look at these companies that are woven into the fabric of our lives, companies that are going to benefit from strength in america or otherwise, and they're paying you a better dividend yield than the so-called risk-free rate of return, you might be ok. > it's almost a bet on the economy i would dare say. matt, good to have you on the show. > > thank you. time for us to sail out of here for today. coming up tomorrow: traders unplugged! find out if our trading pros think amazon stock is the next apple. from all of us at first business, have a terrific thursday!
of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't get something like a basic budget done. >> the problem is we're going to have to do some of this, anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you defer maintenance, if you say to yourself, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's actually a penny wise, pound-foolish decision. it will eventually break and cost you three times as much. that's what's happening with our roads, bridges and highways. if you look at air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated travel systems, we need to update the antiquated computer system. one day you're going to have terrible problems or you're going to have a kind of the system will break down, it's not going to cost $25 billion. it will cost $50 billion. >> there's another thing we don't talk about enough. we're talking about spending as if there's this generally irresponsible spending around. some of that might be true. the bigger issue is nilements, the growth in what those are going to cost us over time. that's the real threat. it's the one that is
, not dumping chemicals bad for the environment, a growing vegetables, how can that be something in violation? >> is a head scratcher. the municipal code is about political power. and right now stay at home gardening is on the rise so more cities will overturn the code but do we want to fight to grow our garden? gerri: it should be a given. more and more cases like this house are the courts responding? >> it is heartening. it is disturbing because property rights are a cornerstone of liberty you can say this is mine and you cannot say anything about it. with eminent domain of use and the epa is a huge violator have been doing a pretty good job they have been slapped down to the epa because they declared someone's land a wetland in you cannot challenge this while be fine you $75,000 per day. gerri: we heard about that. i knew about them in the domain. good reasons and very bad reasons. can and should americans fight back? >> absolutely. politics is messy but one rule is they will find the easiest path to get what they want. there is the case next week involving a guy who had a permit the city
jointly. >> precisely. >> that kind of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't even get a budget done. >> and the problem is we're going to have to do some of this anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you differ maintenance, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's penny-wise but pound pool foolish. the whole thing will break and cost you three times the amount. air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated air traffic systems. we need to update the computers. it's $25 billion. we're not spending that money because as you say spending is is a dirty word. but one day you're going to have terrible problems or you're going to have -- the system will break down. then it's not going to cost $25 billion. it will cost $50 billion. >> another thing we don't talk about enough. we're talking about spending as if there's this generally irresponsible spending. the bigger issue is entitlements, the growth in what those are going to cost us over time. that's the real threat, the one hardest to deal with because it's stuff peopl
of your soap to make the environment cleaner. >> first, she became a side line star during the championship game. the girlfriend of alabama quarterback finds herself in the smot light after comments made about her looks. >> from our camera, we can see mainly bright skies over the bay area. and our weather will be turning colder, i'll have the accu-weather forecast coming up. >> another check of traffic this is 101 in san rafael moving nicely in both directi hey america, even though she doesn't need them, the depend silhouette briefs for charity to prove how great the fit is even under a fantastic dress. the best protection now looks, fits and feels just like underwear. we invite you to get a free sample and try one on too. >>> bcs championship game turned into a one sided route. >> more competitive was the twitter web concerning catherine webb. >> twitter blew up in the stands. first comments centers around espn announcer's fawning over webb also miss alabama then got personal. >> yes. nfl star invited her out for wing asks a visit to the strip club because that is what eve
enough people. and how do we get them in an environment in which nobody wants to serve and we have a hard time making national security decisions about what to do and make them honestly and intelligently. we've had a pretty lousy record of making intelligent decisions about national security in the last few years. >> i just think it's fascinating that we're now in a position where we need to be transitioning from being a military that is making all of its decisions about dwell time and how much time you got between deployments and who is going to deploy where and when to instead thinking about a mill they're is not at war, that needs to decide what its strength is going to be, its training requirements, its weapons systems are going to be. and the last time we did this really is after vietnam and we've got all these vietnam guys. >> you're absolutely right. if you talk to a guy like marty dempsey, chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, and you get him against the corner and we're inside the cone of silence and he'll tell you honestly what he believes, he will tell you that one of the majo
to be an economic and political environment. that's going to be the story for 2013. >> we get a lot of people who come in who it seems to me lately there's a big divergence. there are those who are optimistic about things and think things will go well. others that say, forget it, we've seen all the gains. which camp would you put yourself in? >> i guess i'm not wholistically in either camp. it's more an optimist than a pessimist. we've seen stock correlations begin to fall a little bit. that's encouraging. it says that investors are begin to go loor fop companies that figure out how to make money in a slow growth environment. not sure what the indices will do, but i think the companies that are positioned to save other people company. i was thinking about the people who sell cnbc their coffee cups. you don't do that. somebody has figured out how to do that on large scale and make a lot of money doing it. so those kinds of companies we're going to look for. that means selectivity. that means looking in place that's we don't like from a mook row point of view such as europe. >> but from the average
it's had a tremendous year in production, but the political and security environment there remains very challenging. dagen: any other countries, saudi arabia, even the united states with its increasing production here that can make up any loss that we might see in iraq, like is there any cushion anywhere else in the world? >> well, you know, when you look at, you know, where we can see potentially within opec, the saudis are the ones who have their capacity. it becomes an interesting what the saudis will do in terms if we did see losses coming out of iraq. right now we've seen iraqi exports down 10% in december but have not seen a major attack on a facility. for now i think everyone is in sort of wait and see mode. another country you want to watch though is libya. libyan production has been another country that has allowed us to absorb the loss of iranian exports. you do want to watch, do we see any potential problems in libya? that's a country where the security situation does not remain very stable. dagen: thank you. >> thank you for having me. happy new year. connell: let's mov
interest rate environment, the weak dollar environment will come back and boost these battles. silver has lost even more momentum. start to look at these battles. after the debt talks are over, he thinks that everyone will go back. connell: listening to you very closely today. you got the alabama game right last night. didn't you pick alabama? sandra: i did. connell: sandra smith. thank you. dagen: and then you have a quarterback who dated a girl who went to auburn. it is a little past quarter past the hour. nicole: we are seeing at&t as one of the big laggards. at&t told more than 7 million smart phones in the fourth quarter. this is a record for them. obviously copying the prior numbers that we have seen. these telecom type companies are coming under pressure. here is a look at the broader market averages. the dow jones industrials down about 80 points right now. back to you. dagen: thank you. connell: we will talk to bret baier coming up. dagen: alabama's big moment in the spotlight. oh, the people came running on twitter. connell: joining us from vegas is nick cannon. a lot coming up.
guards in every school is something that will enhance the learning environment, and that's our first responsibility inside of school, is the learning environment. you don't want to make this an armed camp for kids. i don't think that's a positive example for children. we should be able to figure out some other ways to enhance safety. >> new jersey governor chris christie. my next guest says armed guards are exactly what american schools need. in the wake of sandy hook elementary school massacre, sheriff joe arpaio has called for armed volunteers to patrol about 50 schools in his jurisdiction. welcome to you, sheriff. >> how are you doing, piers? >> explain to me why you believe that the answer to these gun massacres is to have a lot more guns. >> well, you know, i'm not going to get into that. we have many, many laws pertaining to guns already. we ought to enforce those laws, but i'm taking immediate action. i have a volunteer posse made up of 3,500 armed, well trained, 100 hours of training. we just finished another program at the malls. very successful. so why not utilize and mobil
much money. the deposit growth here is unbelievable. but in this environment, people want net interest margin. they want the bank to make more money or more mortgages. >> some banks out there, just declined only six basis points. that's how optimistic some on wall street will be going into this quarter. the sequential decline, it's 3.56 for the fourth quarter from 3.66 in the third. as you mentioned, ten-base point decline. so that picture has been dimming a bit. total lending has increased. >> not enough to offset the incredible increase in the deposits. what did they take in over -- >> $30 billion in the quarter. >> 12% annualized. even with that rescinding of the insurance beyond 250,000, still deposit flows. yet you can't put it into productive loans or you don't want to because you worry about credit quality and we end up with contracting energy -- >> look, we're at a moment where i don't think anybody who's got a mortgage, they know they're getting a good price. the ohio regionals are going to do better. that welgs is now a sale. look, wells could go to 33. if it had been to 32,
environment. if the yield curve starts to stephen as we've seen in the -- to stephen as we've seen in the first weeks of 2013, that will eliminate net interest margin pressure. profitability should improve for the group. >> how much do you care about what's going on in washington over the next two months? >> i think that's important because the austerity measures being talked about in washington will slow general economic growth in the country. and as you know, that's a real driver for bank loan growth. and so if those austerity measures are too much and puts us into possibly a recession or just slower growth, that will affect the outlook for the banks. i think you're going to see that the housing market's going to continue to grow. and that's going to be a real driver to the success of the banks this year. >> okay. now in your note to clients, you say that your four best ideas -- i'll list them. walk us through why you like them. you like discover financial services, fifth third bancorp, pnc financial, and wells fargo. >> yes, when you hook at starting with the last one, wells far
into recession. it's been in a recession type environment for a while. and the only grimace of hope is that the chinese economy has been showing signs of growth and the japanese are earmarking trying to get their growth profile. it's a race to the bottom. last year, there was a lot of risk that people thought we were going to have and didn't happen and then this year, thought there would be a massive allocation out of equities. i think that shows the first quarter is not going to be a one shot off the the risk markets. >> george, thanks for joining us this morning. we appreciate that. and now let's just remind you what else is still to come. two of the biggest names in hedge funds are locking horns over herbalife. we'll tell you what you need to know, coming up. with hotwire's low prices, we can afford to take an extra trip this year. first boston... then san francisco. hotwire checks the competitions' rates every day so they can guarantee their low prices. so our hotels were half price. ♪ h-o-t-w-i-r-e... ♪ hotwire.com ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash befor
at the environment today and our politicians don't seem to be serious about spending, they seem to think that the public is more concerned with screwing the rich than hitting up programs. are they right? >> people felt that way but myself is that obama, the carry interest rate that allows hedge fund people taxed at capital gains rate, obama defended that. that is one of the big things. that is warren buffett and rich friends. this is disingenuous but the country should be rising up. >> neil: they are not rising up. >> i think this is because it's going to explode. somebody is going to say, my grandchildren and children, this is moral issue being kicked down the road. these people will not deal with it and the republican handling of this was let me just put it this way, just about as stupid as i have ever seen in my lifetime. only matched by what they did the year before. >> neil: well put. happy new year. >> did any of you the streamliner. another nightmare. all safe. but why are so many plain scared? ♪ [ male announcer ] the distances aren't getting shorter. ♪ the trucks are going f
don't agree with that, but that's what happened. the environment is different this time, and i'm actually pleased to tell you that the speaker of the assembly, john perez, and others have engaged in a bipartisan approach to fixing this and there's bipartisan support for pushing through a law that would fix the problem. and essentially, what it will do is this. instead of referring to rape by fraud, only if the perp is impersonating the spouse, it will be, if the perpetrator is impersonating an intimate partner, which more accurately flects common and modern-day relationships. >> so, wait, you said it died in the senate because it would have increased the budget. is that in part part of increasing the prison population? >> that's correct, exactly right. as you know, california recently underwent a shift in criminal justice policy, where we realigned state responsibilities for low-level offenders to the counties, because a three-judge court panel decided that we rightly had decided that we had an overcrowding problem in california state prisons, and we needed to relieve the popul
puts climate change atop the threats. will the environment finally become a legislative priority? we'll discuss that just ahead. what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto policies come with accident forgiveness if you qualify, where your rates won't go up due to your first accident, and new car replacement, where, if you total your new car, we give you the money for a new one. call... to talk to an insurance expert about everything else that comes standard with our base auto policy. and if you get into an accident and use one of our certified repair shops, your repairs are guaranteed for life. call... to switch, and you c
-- a hospital operating room so they would have to have the ventilation system for a sterile environment even though one is not needed to perform an abortion. they would have to have regulated widths for hallways and doors for abortion clinics. and this is another one that is rather interesting, there would be a minimum number of parking spaces required for abortion clinics. so these are all sort of the nitpicky ways that conservatives have used, you know, local laws, state laws, to restrict a woman's right to access to preventative care. >> and, you know, maria teresa, to jonathan's point, many of these clinics that so upset social conservatives offer, as you know, a wide variety of health service. for instance, screenings for various kinds of cancer. what is it about helping often poor single women that so upsets conservatives? >> well, i think you hit the nail on the head, martin. the conservative folks going after a woman's right to choose, and it's the extreme right, they are basically talking both sides of their mouth. at the same time they don't want preventative care. they don't want
. it will focus on the low interest rate environment and we'll see a pop in these commodities again. is that your play? >> gold is special. i think, don't think of gold as a commodity. think of it as a currency. i think that is what the world's fourth or fifth currency, it will gain more popularity. everyone wants to deflate their currency. other commodities we need a stronger economy. could be second half play. could be somewhere out next year. i'm, i'm the equity strategist. i don't claim to be an expert on this. there is value there. we'll start with oil. i think gold is different. other commodities will come along later on. ashley: scott is the race to debase across the world really and it has been going on for some time. gold has not really responded in the rate you think it would. what do you, what is your thought on gold and where it goes from here? >> we're in really not that interested in gold right now. ashley: no? >> i think it's going to pretty much flat line from here and it's just something that moves in the rest of the year along with any political moves. same way we're cautiously
well in the current environment. you can't survive in this industry unless you continue to cut costs. we've got a great track record, frankly, over the last five years of delivering, you know, circa 100 million pounds of cost savings year on year. we intend to do that going forward. >> and joining us with more, founder and managing director at neeve capital. thanks for joining us. how tough is if for the gross? tough for morrison's. we get tesco tomorrow. >> i think it is tough and goes beyond the economy. i think what's happened is to some extent people are prioritizing spending on other things over food. you've seen so much food inflation the last two, three years that people almost prefer to spend it on treat like apple, for example, or clothing. what that actually has meant is people are discovering or rediscovering that it's cool enough to shop, and people have discovered you can get good quality stuff at really much cheaper prices. and i think in other terms, what people are doing is they're shopping on convenience. they want to go? where closer to them. they don't actually lik
, that is it, and not only that, that shell gas production is cleaning the environment because we use more natural gas, using less coal, that means less greenhouse e mageses, and they are musing less emissions than they have in many years. great news today. >> wow, thank you so much. great report. >> thank you. >> okay, switching gears here to talk about the housing market. six years after the bubble burst, the consumer protection bureau set to outline a new set of home loan rules, but will the guidelines make the mortgage process transparent or add to confusion? asking someone who has a wealth of experience in the mortgage industry, bill emerson. great to have you with us. >> great to be here, lori. lori: what a year quicken had. $70 billion in loans closed versus the prior here and record of $30 billion. that is tremendous growth. why were conditions and even confidence among home buyers so improved in that time? >> well, i think there's a variety of reasons for that. number one, rates were low. that's helpful. number two, market participants shifted focus on what they wanted to do for m
our national security needs are, and make cuts in the environment and housing and transportation, and i just believe that i'm better prepared having just done what i have done to do this. it's not that i'd be the best interim senator ever. just that in these particular circumstances with very complex issues as kind of a continuation, i'm there, and i believe it's very important for us to go after them, for example, on this phony, irresponsible issue on the debt limit and do defense, social security, and medicare. the two most successful anti-poverty programs in history. at a time when people say we have too much inequality, the notion you would increase in equality is nuts, and further -- look, i had some unhappiness when i read about chuck hagel's remarks from 14 years ago, which i didn't remember, but now the question is he's a man who is going to help us withdraw from afghanistan and reduce the military. i'm very encouraged by that. my one criticism of the president was he wasn't going far enough in reducing the military. i think people now understand that it's either keeping
itself in an environment of which the president's won re-election and they don't want him to do anything he wants. they're also very muched concerned generally about what hagel probably intends to do and that is to continue panetta's effort to streamline the pentagon and make budget cuts. those who are in favor of a strong defense are against that and therefore against hagel's perception more cuts are necessary and finally there is a great deal of concern about hagel's statement that unilateral american action in trying to restrict what iran can do economically and with its money, hagel doesn't think that's a good thing to do and lots of people on both sides of the aisle in the senate who disagree with hagel about that and hearing about that in the hearings. >> it's interesting, colonel, that, again, going back to his war record and when you look at our nation as the president pointed out, could have a leader as secretary of defense who has been in that situation. he knows what it is like to have young men and women in the mud and the ground and like to see people, you go in to war with
and get some of the issues out of the way. >> we've lived in this environment for the last 18 months, one big disaster after another. everyone is waiting for the policy response, comes at the 11th hour and 59th minute. this is a pattern everyone has gotten used to but the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling are the last big tail risks we think of the tail risks that we have to worry about, saw we would say once we get past that over the next several months we think it will lift a little bit of a cloud and investors will take risks. >> good to see you. >> good to see you. >> thanks so much for joining us. >> bob, thanks to you as well. ten minutes to go before we close it up. the dow jones industrial average holding on to a gain of 50 points. >> well, this herbalife soap opera is continuing. herb greenberg is coming up. all over the big move in the stock. take a look. up 3.25% right now. we'll show you what's behind it. >> and can you believe the iphone was only introduced five years ago? it is true. five years ago today, in fact, so here's a trivia question for you. the iphone alone is wort
normal, if you will, in a lot of these companies given the fact that the regulatory environment is getting worse and globalization is not necessarily on their side where it was so many years ago? is this going to be the new normal? well, i don't think so. here's the question. will the politicians get it right? will we go over the cliff, another debt ceiling and if we don't we could have a very robust capital markets this year, an that's what encourages me for the big money centers. for the smaller guys starved for loan growth and margin pressures they will be buyers. the really small guys will be the sellers and you'll see a lot of m & a opportunity out here. >> jason this morning you raised estimates on three banks. you lowered estimates on nine banks. tell me what was behind that. you're expecting the quarter to be what, more negative than positive for the sector overall? how do you see it? >> fine tuning here and there with overall estimate. i think generally for the earnings for the quarter. we think about half our banks will beat expectations. half miss. if you think during
we like wells fargo a lot. they get hurt in a low rate environment, they'll be helped a tremendous amount when short rates move up, and investors have not yet been willing to believe that the mortgage profits are sustainable. even though wells has got 30% market share of the mortgage market, which over time should be a positive. it's just they're not willing to give them full credit for it yet. >> moshe, thanks for your time. >> thanks very much. >> i did want to discuss some breaking news on morgan stanley. the company, a number of news outlets reporting job cuts coming there. we can confirm and clarify some of those reports. morgan stanley sources close to the company indicating they will cut about 6% of its overall institutional securities, and infrastructure staff. those cuts will total 1,600 jobs, half would be international, half will be domestic. again, 6% of securities and infrastructure. now, putting that in perspective, the company has 57,000 total employees. some have reported 6% overall, that is not correct. again, if you do the math, it would be 1,600 total. they've be
. that's the bleed air. and that bleed air usually does everything from controlling the environment within the cabin, the heating and the cooling, onboard electronics. what makes the dreamliner so different, so unique, is the amount of innovation that's gone in to using these lithium ion batteries in order to run the electronics on the plane. well, part of the problem here is, you're taking an amount of electricity that is coming off of these generators, in a very confined and small space, andrew, i mean this would be different if you were in the middle of a power plant. you'd say no problem. companies do this all the time. now you're trying to do this inside of an airplane. we should point out, this has gone through certification at the faa, repeated testing. it's not like they're just throwing these planes up there and there hasn't been any kind of safety checks. they went through extensive tests. if the issue now is was there, and this is something i think we're going to hear about in the next couple of days, is there a specific, perhaps malfunction with some of the electronics a
diversity and we are in a tough political environment. with key cabinet picks already announced, the defense, state, and cia, the shift is now on others. >> does he settle on these names or still sifting through tough choices? >> he will make an announcement when he makes a decision. >> reporter: timothy geithner is expected to leave and although wall street and progressives are he can pressed concerns. someone with business expertise and with lisa jackson departing the environmental protection agency, a replacement is needed for her, too. it's a second-term ritual that douglas brinkley is often -- >> they pick people they wish they could have picked the first time around but you can't with the politics of a campaign when you're first making to the white house. >> reporter: climate is still a factor. susan rice withdrew her name to replace hillary clinton under pressure over her actions after the benghazi attacks. >> i think the political climate matters a lot now with who you pick. it shouldn't but it does. >> reporter: and there's pressure under the president to consider diversity after a
on wall street to be concerned. but we're not really in a political environment, brooke, where the -- neither the white house nor most people are concerned with whether or not wall street likes the pick. but he is -- he's a guy who had experience. he was involved in the 1997 balanced budget deal. he's been involved in social security legislation. all the topics that are hot right now, jack lew does have experience with. >> you mentioned sequestration, of course. we have a couple of fiscal cliffs over the next two months. do we have any idea what kind of negotiator he'll be and he'll drive a tough bargain with the speaker of the house, john boehner. >> as the chief of staff of the white house, that's a key issue. you got to be able to be tough, you got to be able to negotiate. if you were grading the white house and its negotiating abilities in the last few months, you may not give them a very high grade. what you get in jack lew is a guy who is highly, specifically familiar with the budgeting process. i wouldn't normally say this, that that's the most important thing a treasury
the submarine n that environment to have the largest insurance company in the world that had written savings protection contracts to thousands, hundreds of thousands of american households and to a bunch of state and local governments to have that inconstitution fail in that environment our judgment would have been catastrophic. >> all right. who's right? >> dishonesty of that statement we saw in the testimony from congress. aig was not saved to protect savings accounts. it was saved so that aig could make its payments that alexis would describe earlier. to the largest too big to fail bank that's made the reckless counter party bet risks on aig and the taxpayer was footing the bill. look, even tim geithner himself in some ways acknowledge that was an unfair thing when he authorized his people to negotiate with the banks to try to have a discount, not 100 cents on the dollar buying securities at a time were worth less than half that amount. it was a half hearted, you know, just terrible effort that it didn't go anywhere. >> we were talking about right before those clips the loss of faith in s
to the other? >> absolutely. think about the environment. think about earth. shibani: water bottles. >> we call this rewind. we use recycle plastic bottles and created our own fabric. shibani: tell me how you elaborate. you are a business leader now. >> we are a family and we have ideas and we are creative and we have access to so many things. growing up in our lives we have always been approached with different ideas from different people. we thought it was a perfect opportunity to go together and use these natural fibers, beverages and fabrics and build a family legacy. with these wonderful products and the design, they are beautiful. it is very earth friendly, eco- friendly. shibani: technology has helped you. >> we are here, of course. we are part of the family now. we are excited to be here. shibani: thank you so much. house of marley. back to you guys. ashley: shibani joshi. that is good stuff. tracy: she has the best job. the weak economy forcing many people with the flu to go to work anyway. doctor manny alvarez says do not do it. he is here next. ashley: let's take a look at the ten an
in our urban environments and yes, under these circumstances where somebody goes in and shoots up a movie theater or shoots up a school. let's take the steps that make the most sense today. i had a great conversation yesterday with vice president biden. and i know he is preparing his recommendations to the president. and i don't want to get into the details of the discussion, but he's got this down pretty well. he understands what we need to do to make it less likely that these things are going to happen in our cities and towns and these mass murders could be limited at least going into the future if some common-sense things are taken. the magazine thing is very big. >> wes. >> and it seems like a large part of the issue as well is there are actually laws that are sitting on the becomes, laws that are supposed to be enforced by atf and federal authorities that they have not had the capacity to be able to enforce. where does that fall into the larger conversation as well, and what can states and municipalities do to actually enforce what's there right now, but we have been woefully insuffi
in the pool or humid environments, talking in the rain, you'll be protected with the coating. >> oh, no way. >> there you go, brooke. amazing. >> have him pull it back out and turn it on. because i don't believe him. >> just so i -- okay, i'm going to dump one here as well. and let's pull it out, make sure that it is working. >> or that was a really nice iphone 5. look at that. look at that. so when is this on the market, dan? >> how do folks -- so brooke is asking, we all want to know how can you get this? >> we're working to implement this in a lot of carriers and retailers. you can actually go into a store, or go to www.liquipel.com, order it and we'll send the device to us. we're based out of orange county, california, looking to go across the u.s. we're in hong kong and malaysia, australia, russia, and turkey. and about to be in china as well. >> thanks very much, sam. costs you about 60 bucks. one more time, brooke. there you go. we're going to be at ces over the next couple of days. we're looking for fun companies like this, but companies that have a real practical implication in peo
he kind of gets away with it. one area he has credibility is on the environment. many years ago before it was a mainstream subject, he was championing protecting the rain forest and wildlife. he was talking about that today on british tv and he made a few comments. he says since he found out he's going to become a grandfather, the duchess of cambridge is obviously pregnant, his opinions about conservation have actually become much stronger. >> have gone on for years about importance of thinking, about the long term, in relation to environmental damage, climate change, everything else. because we don't really in a sense airline world want to hand on an increasingly dysfunctional world to our grandchildren. and i don't want to be confronted by my future grandchild say, why didn't you do something. so clearly, now that there's a -- we'll have a grandchild, obviously, it makes it even more obvious, you know, to try and make sure we have them, leave them something that isn't a totally poisoned -- >> this is something, wolf, he spoke about in the past. he thinks it's the greatest thre
to sort of build a better environment for consumers, dr. sachs, where is the consumer today on being treated fairly by the banks, being given clear information, being not put in situations where they're going to go under water like still so many americans are with their mortgages? >> well, i think we're all confused. >> have any of them improved? >> i think there's probably a little improvement. i think elizabeth war knoren is going to make a big difference because she's going to be watching absolutely. i think the truth is the bankers still run the show in washington as well as on wall street. the thing about bailing out banks, even if you had to bail out the financial system, you don't have to bail out the bankers. and that's where they didn't know how to draw the line. and i think what you said, joe, is absolutely right. the campaign contributions have been the focus on both parties. this time they went wildly for the republican side because it's true. you do the slightest thing, it's indignation. you only gave us hundreds of billions of dollars of bailout. how dare you say a word
., their compensation structure is too high in the current environment. just like everything else in life, the price of stuff goes down, the price of banking services, we know we're trading stocks now for three or four bucks online. the pay structure has completely evolved to the point where these banks are realizing, it's not sustainable. and they're getting smaller. and i know there's -- listen, not a lot of sympathy out there for wall street or the pay or whatever. but these are also men and women losing their jobs. and i'll tell you what is risky is new york city, guys. don't forget that right now one in every five tax dollars for new york city comes from the financial services community. so while there will be -- listen, a lot of people will be like, well, they've been overpaid for years, whatever. the point is, this could take a hit on new york city, it's not like you're going to eliminate a banker's job and replace that with another job that makes a couple hundred thousand a year. so watch new york city. i'm sure they're not real happy about this, as well. the banks are simply too big, guys.
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